Guide To Further Reading

Anderson IM, Nutt D J et al 2000 Evidence-based guidelines for treating depressive disorders with antidepressants: a revision of the 1993 British Association for Psychopharmacology guidelines. Journal of Psychopharmacology 14: 3-20 Ballenger J C et al 1998 Consensus statement on panic disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 59: 47-54 Ballenger J C et al 1998 Consensus statement on social anxiety disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 59: 54-60 Ballenger J C et al 2000 Consensus statement on posttraumatic stress disorder from the International Consensus Group on Depression and Anxiety. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 61: 60-66 Ballenger J C et al 2001 Consensus statement on generalized anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychiatry 62: 53-58 Davies S J C et al 1999 Association of panic disorder and panic attacks with hypertension. American Journal of Medicine 107: 310-316 Ferrier I N 2001 Developments in mood stabilisers.

British Medical Bulletin 57:179-192 Fink M 2001 Convulsive therapy: a review of the first 55 years. Journal of Affective Disorders 63:1-15

Free Yourself from Panic Attacks

Free Yourself from Panic Attacks

With all the stresses and strains of modern living, panic attacks are become a common problem for many people. Panic attacks occur when the pressure we are living under starts to creep up and overwhelm us. Often it's a result of running on the treadmill of life and forgetting to watch the signs and symptoms of the effects of excessive stress on our bodies. Thankfully panic attacks are very treatable. Often it is just a matter of learning to recognize the symptoms and learn simple but effective techniques that help you release yourself from the crippling effects a panic attack can bring.

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