Cancer Causes and Treatment

10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

10 Ways To Fight Off Cancer

Learning About 10 Ways Fight Off Cancer Can Have Amazing Benefits For Your Life The Best Tips On How To Keep This Killer At Bay Discovering that you or a loved one has cancer can be utterly terrifying. All the same, once you comprehend the causes of cancer and learn how to reverse those causes, you or your loved one may have more than a fighting chance of beating out cancer.

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50 Things About 50 Cancers

This ebook from medical practitioner and family doctor Dr. Parajuli gives you all of the signs and symptoms that you need to know in order to catch cancer in the very early stages and protect yourself from it. You don't have to worry about if you have cancer anymore, and better yet you don't have to spend thousands of dollars to make sure of that either! All it takes is a bit of knowledge and you are on your way! This book also teaches about other aspects of cancer patients, such as how to live with different kinds of cancer, how to prepare yourself mentally to accept this reality if it IS a reality for you, and how to deal with doctors and insurance companies. This book is easy to read and in PDF format, so you don't have to worry at all about reading it. Make it easy on yourself!

Do I Have Cancer Overview

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Normal PrecancerCancer Sequence

Insight into tumor development first came from epidemiological studies that examined the relationship between age and cancer incidence that showed that cancer incidence increases with roughly the fifth power of elapsed age (2). Hence, it was predicted that at least five rate-limiting steps must be overcome before a clinically observable tumor could arise. It is now known that these rate-limiting steps Given that tumorigenesis is the result of mutations in a select set of genes, much effort by cancer biologists has been focused on identifying these genes and understanding how they function to alter cell growth. Early efforts in this area were lead by virologists studying retrovirus-induced tumors in animal models. These studies led to cloning of the first onco-genes and the realization that oncogenes, indeed all cancer-related genes, are aberrant forms of genes that have important functions in regulating normal cell growth (4). In subsequent studies, these newly identified onco-genes...

Contemporary Cancer Research

Cancer Diagnostics Current and Future Trends, edited by Robert N. Nakamura, Wayne Cancer Gene Therapy, edited by David T. Curiel and Joanne T. Douglas, 2004 DNA Damage and Repair, Volume 3 Advances from Phage to Humans, edited by Jac A. Nickoloff and Merl F. Hoekstra, 2001 Prostate Cancer Biology, Genetics, and the New Therapeutics, edited by Leland W. K. Chung, William B. Isaacs, and Jonathan W. Simons, 2001 Chemokines and Cancer, edited by Barrett J. Rollins, 1999 Breast Cancer Moleuclar Genetics, Pathogens, and Therapeutics, edited by Anne M. Bowcock, 1999

Cancerrelated Genes 41 Oncogenes

There are seven classes of oncogenes, classified by their location in the cell and their biochemical activity (Table 1.3). All of these oncogenes have different properties that can lead to cancer. The classes of oncogenes are growth factors, growth factor receptors, membrane-associated guanine nucleotide-binding proteins, serine-threonine protein kinases, cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases, nuclear proteins, and cytoplasmic proteins that affect cell survival. form of growth factors that bind to and activate specific growth factor receptors. Predictably, one class of oncogenes consists of growth factors that can stimulate tumor cell growth. In normal cells and tissues, growth factors are produced by one cell type that then act on another cell type. This is termed paracrine stimulation. However, many cancer cells secrete their own growth factors as well as express the cognate receptors that are stimulated by those factors. Because of this autocrine stimulation, cancer cells are less dependent...

Epidemiology Of Cancer And Aging

Lodovico Balducci, Program Leader, Senior Adult Oncology Program, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute, Tampa, Florida, Professor of Oncology and Medicine, University of South Florida College of Medicine, Tampa, Florida. Matti Aapro, Director, Multidisciplinary Oncology Institute, Clinique de Genolier, Switzerland. Epidemiology provides the initial clue to causes and mechanisms of diseases. It is well known that age is a risk factor for most common cancer and that incidence and prevalence of cancer increase with age1. In this chapter we explore the epidemiology of cancer and aging, in an attempt to understand the biologic interactions of these processes. In particular, we address the following questions 1. Does aging enhance the susceptibility of older individuals to environmental carcinogens 3. Does the clinical behavior of cancer change with age 4. Does cancer increase the risk of death of older individuals In conclusion we will examine the clinical implications of...

Finding the Breast Cancer Genes

Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide, and is heavily publicized as the leading cause of cancer death for women in Britain and the second leading cause of cancer death for women in the United States.7 The news media, medical charities, and public health organizations in each country quote that a British woman has a 1-in-12 chance of developing invasive breast cancer during her lifetime, and that an American woman has a 1-in-8 chance. Although governments and medical charities (including the Imperial Cancer Research Fund and Cancer Research Campaign in Britain and the National Cancer Institute and American Cancer Society) have spent a considerable amount of money to look for a cause and to develop prevention and treatment strategies for the disease, neither an unequivocal cause nor a completely effective prevention, detection, or treatment strategy has yet been found. Mastectomy, which involves breast removal, not only has severe physiological and...

Age And Carcinogenesis

The incidence of common cancers increases with age (Figure 1). This association is universal 2 and is observed with the aging of any population around the world. A clear explanation of this phenomenon is the time-length of carcinogenesis, a stepwise process involving the activation of cellular oncogenes, and the suppression of anti-proliferative genes (anti-oncogenes)3. It is reasonable to assume that the duration of carcinogenesis reflects the number of stages involved in the pathogenesis of different tumors, and that this number be highest for tumors whose incidence peaks late in life, such as adenocarcinoma of the prostate and of the large bowel, or non-melanomatous skin cancer 3. In the era of chemoprevention and recognition and elimination of environmental carcinogens, an alternative possibility should be considered. These interventions may cause the prolongation of one or more carcinogenic steps and, in so doing they may delay the development of cancer. For example, the...

Drug Compliance by Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients Challenges for the Physician

22.2.1 Cancer, Compliance, and Adolescence Definitions and Interactions . . . . . . 355 22.2.1.1 Cancer and Adolescence . . 355 23.6.1 Impact Cancer, a Transition Model . . 371 24.2.1 Information About Cancer Diagnosis, Prognosis, and Treatment 376 25.3 Generic an Cancer-Specific Measures 25.6 HRQL Measurement and Clinical Cancer Care 390

Clinical Proteomics Ovarian Cancer 133

8.2.1 Ovarian Cancer 135 8.3 Cancer Proteomics 140 8.3.1 Protein Profiling and Cancer 140 8.3.2 RNA Expression Analysis in Cancer Cells Promises and Pitfalls 141 8.4 Short Overview of Ovarian Cancer Proteomics 145 8.4.1 The Promise of Proteomics in Ovarian Cancer Diagnostics 145

What Significant Events Have Happened In Cancer Research In The Last 25 Years

As I was beginning to gather my thoughts for the fourth edition of Cancer Biology, one of my colleagues mentioned that he thought it would be of interest to describe the significant things that have happened in cancer biology in the 25 years since the first edition was published (1981). Many things have happened since then, of course, and everyone has their favorite list. But looking back at the table of contents for the first edition and at the outline for this edition, several things struck me, as listed below. 1. Cancer susceptibility genes. In 1981 we knew that familial clustering of some cancers occurred, for example, with colon cancer, but the genes involved in this hadn't been determined. The APC, BRCA-1, BRCA-2, and p53 inherited mutations, for example, were not known at that time. Research in this area has identified a number of genes involved in cancer susceptibility, and with modern cloning techniques, more are identified every few months. 3. Genes involved in cancer...

Favorable View Progress in Cancer Prevention and Screening

Recent Results in Cancer Research, Vol. 174 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 Clifton Leaf, in his article Why We're Losing the War on Cancer, presents criticisms of past research approaches and the small impact of this research thus far on producing cures or substantially extending the life of many cancer patients. It is true that gains in long-term survival for people with advanced cancers have been modest, hindered in part by the heterogeneity of tumors, which allows the cancers to persist using alternate molecular pathways and so evade many cancer therapeutics. In contrast, clinical trials have demonstrated that it is possible to reduce the incidence or improve cancer survival through prevention and early detection. Strides have been made in preventing or detecting early the four deadliest cancers in the United States (i.e., lung, breast, prostate, and colorectal). For example, 7-year follow-up data from the Breast Cancer Prevention Trial (BCPT) provides evidence that...

Common Types Of Cancer

In 2003 more than 2 million new cancer cases were diagnosed in the United States alone, and in that same year, more than half a million Americans died of cancer. Cancer can strike anyone, but the risk increases with age, certain lifestyles, and the quality of the environment. Nearly 80 percent of all cancers are diagnosed in patients age 55 and older, and smokers are 20 times more likely to develop lung cancer than nonsmokers. Cancers can appear in any of our tissues and organs, but there are some tissues that are more susceptible than others Skin cells and the epithelial cells lining the lungs and digestive tract are prominent members in this group. All of these tissues and organs are at the interphase between the external environment and our internal organs, and like a sailor on the mast, take the full force of the storm when it hits (see table on page 3). The skin is exposed to daily doses of ultraviolet (UV) radiation and a variety of chemicals in the environment. The lungs, while...

Prevalence Of Cancer In Ra

The link between RA and cancers is based on numerous case reports of RA patients who developed solid and lymphoproliferative cancers and on large population-based studies. Cases of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) 10 , acute and chronic leukemia 11-12 , multiple myeloma 13 , and lung cancers 14 were all reported in association with RA patients. Over the last three decades, several studies have reported the rate of cancer among large cohorts of RA patients 5-7 . Furthermore, the contribution of various DMARDs to the overall risk of cancer and to the risk of lymphoproliferative tumors was also reported 15-19 . Mortality and autopsies studies have indicated a low rate of cancer-related deaths among patients with RA compared to the general population 20-22 , In three mortality studies, the rate of death as result of cancer was between 7-11 . In a cohort of 1000 patients with RA followed over 3 years between 19701975, cancer was the cause of death in 9 of the total deaths compared to 27 in the...

Risk Of Cancer In Ra Compared To The General Population

(a) an increased risk for the development of all cancers (b) an increased risk for the development of specific cancer types (d) low risk for the development of certain cancers. The risk of cancer among patients with RA was studied in small and large cohorts of RA patients followed at certain rheumatology clinics and in large population-based studies. Table 1 shows the relative risk of cancer among patients with RA compared to the general population. The table shows that while some of the studies indicate that the overall risk of cancer in RA is not increased 5, 6, 15, 23, 24 , others have shown a significantly increased risk of cancer in patients with RA compared with the general population 7,25, 27, 28 , In three large population-based long-term studies of RA patients living in Scandinavia, the overall risk of cancer was not increased in two cohorts 5, 6 , and a significant 11 increase in all cancers was observed within the third cohort 7 , The studies populations comprised 46,101 RA...

Specific Cancers And Ra

Lymphoproliferative Cancers The data from several cohorts of RA patients who developed malignant neoplasms indicate that RA is associated with an increased risk of lymphoproliferative cancers including lymphoma 5-7, 16, 25, 30 , leukemia 5, 6, 24, 25, 27 and myeloma 5 , Table 2 shows the relative risk for development of lymphoproliferative diseases in patients with RA compared to the general population. A 1.5- to 8.7-fold increased risks for all lymphoproliferative cancers were observed in several studies 6, 7, 15, 27 . In two large population-based studies, the risks of developing all lymphoproliferative cancers were 1.52 (1.2-1.9) 6 and 1.7(1.5-2.0) 7 , While the relative risks for haematopoietic cancers among men and women with RA were similar (1.7 each) in a large cohort of patients with RA 7 , other studies reported higher risks for lymphoproliferative cancers among men with RA 6, 27 and among men with Felty's syndrome 25 . Prior 27 found the of cancer

Profile Of The Older Cancer Patient

Aging is associated with reduced functional reserve of multiple organ systems, increased prevalence of comorbidity, memory disorders, depression, malnutrition, polypharmacy and functional dependence 51. It is legitimate to ask whether these conditions may interfere with the treatment of cancer and may reduce the patient's life expectancy and tolerance of treatment to the point that treatment is futile or even harmful. In three studies, cancer patients aged 70 and older had undergone a comprehensive geriatric assessment prior to the institution of treatment, with similar conclusions 52-54 Some form of functional dependence was present in up to 70 of patients, some form of comorbidity in up to 90 , depression, malnutrition and memory disorders in approximately 20 and polypharmacy in 40 . . A review of the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) data also revealed that some form of comorbidity was present in the majority of cancer patients aged 65 and older 55. These studies...

Prevalence Of Cancer In

Subsequent studies have shown the frequency of cancer in patients with SLE to be between 2.5 and 7.3 8-11 , Lewis et al. 8 found the frequency of malignant neoplasms in 484 patients with SLE to be 3.7 . Similarly, 24 cancers were identified in 23 (3.2 ) of 724 SLE patients at a single center during 7233 patient-years of follow-up 12 , A higher prevalence of cancer (7.3 ) was found among 205 consecutive SLE patients followed-up for cancer through the files of the Finnish Cancer Registry 13 , Mortality studies have also found cancer to be an important primary cause of death among patients with SLE. In a recent mortality studies of 665 SLE patients followed-up at a North American lupus clinic, malignant tumors were found in 12 (9.7 ) out of 124 deceased SLE patients. In 6.5 of the total deaths, metastatic cancer was found to be the primary cause 14 .

Specific Cancers And

While the overall frequency of cancers may not increase in patients with SLE, cohorts from various centers have shown that patients with SLE have an increased risk of lymphoproliferative and hematopoietic malignancies. A 4.1 - to 44-fold increased risk for these cancers was observed 12, 13, 15, 16 , However, from this group of cancers, only NHL was significantly associated with an increased risk of cancer. The SIR of NHL in SLE was 5.38 in Toronto 12 , 9.3 in Pittsburgh 15 and 44 in Finland 13 . In a recent study of 1585 patients with SLE from the nationwide Danish Hospital Discharge Register 16 , there was a significant excess of NHL among the SLE patients with RR 5.2. Table 1. The risk estimates for cancer in 4 SLE cohorts compared with the general population Table 1. The risk estimates for cancer in 4 SLE cohorts compared with the general population Cancer risk RR, CI All cancers

Causes Of Cancers In

It is possible that various tumors, and particularly solid cancers, occur simply by chance in patients with SLE with no causal relationship between the development of malignancy and SLE. However, the data of all studies indicate that NHL occurs more commonly in SLE patients compared with the general population. It has been suggested that the use of those agents may be associated with the development of malignancies. Cyclophosphamide therapy has been reported to be associated with bladder cancer, NHL, acute and chronic leukemia. In a previous study 54 , 6 of organ transplant recipient developed malignancies within the first few years after transplantation and immunosuppressive therapy. The most common cancers were, lymphoma and skin and cervix carcinoma. Out of the 20 SLE patients and NHL included in 4 SLE cohorts 12, 13, 15, 16 , only 3 received cyclophosphamide before the diagnosis of NHL. Most of the reported case of ANLL in patients with SLE, occurred in patients who received...

Aging And Multistage Model Of Cancer

The homeostasis of most tissues is maintained thanks to a pool of stem cells able to reproduce themselves and to differentiate. Cell differentiation is followed by cell death and aging maybe construed as a progressive loss of stem cells to differentiation and death 12. Another possibility involves the immortalization of the stem cell that is associated with a loss of differentiation and apoptosis. These immortalized stem cells may give origin to a clonal population with a survival advantage over the remaining tissues this process is carcinogenesis 12,13. (Figure 1). Both differentiation and death, and immortalization are multi-stage processes. Many steps of carcinogenesis are well-characterized 5,6,14,15 whereas the steps of aging need better recognition and definition 6,16. Both models of cellular aging and immortalization involve delayed genomic instability that is a transmission of genomic aberrations to distant cellular progenies, accompanied by the occurrence of new aberrations....

Insulin Like Growth Factor Related Signaling and Cancer Development

Recent Results in Cancer Research, Vol. 174 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2007 In this review, selected examples of recent research developments concerning insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and insulin in the context of cancer risk assessment and prevention will be discussed. We reviewed background information related to IGF physiology at the cellular and whole-organism levels, together with prior work concerning IGF-I levels and risk of a variety of cancers, including breast, prostate, colon, and lung in 2004 (Pollak et al. 2004). A comprehensive update to that general review (Pollak et al. 2004) is scheduled for Nature Reviews Cancer in early 2007. General Background Issues Concerning Cancer Risk Assessment Individuals are distinct from each other not only regarding their level of cancer risk, but also with respect to the dominant mechanism underlying their risk. As an example related to breast cancer, consider five women a carrier of a BRCA1 mutation, a woman who started to...

Efect Of Aging On The Susceptibility To Carcinogenesis In Vivo

Animal experiments seem to confirm that there are age related differences in sensitivity to carcinogen in some tissues. Thus, with age, susceptibility to carcinogens in murine mammary gland, small intestine and colon, thyroid, ovarian follicular epithelium decreases, in subcutaneous tissue, cervix uteri and vagina increases and in others (lung, hemopoietic tissues) it remains stable (Table 1). For details see references 1,5-6). Age-related differences in cancer susceptibility have been observed after exposure to the same carcinogens in experimental systems. For example, in female rats exposed to N-nitrosomethylurea (NMU) in doses 10, 20 or 50 mg kg at the age of 3 month developed mammary carcinomas, tumors of the kidney, ovaries and colon. In contrast to young animals, the rats exposed to the same doses of the carcinogen at the age of 15 months showed a higher frequency of tumors of the corpus and cervix uteri, and a lower frequency of mammary and intestinal adenocarcinomas and tumors...

Metabolic Activation of Chemical Carcinogens

As studies on the reactions of carcinogens with cellular macromolecules progressed, it became apparent that most of these interactions resulted from covalent bond formation between an elec-trophilic form of the carcinogen and the nucle-ophilic sites in proteins (e.g., sulfur, oxygen, and nitrogen atoms in cysteine, tyrosine, and histi-dine, respectively) and nucleic acids (e.g., purine or pyrimidine ring nitrogens and oxygens). Frequently, the parent compound itself did not interact in vitro with macromolecules until it had been incubated with liver homogenates or liver microsomal fractions. These studies led to the realization that metabolic activation of cer tain carcinogenic agents is necessary to produce the ultimate carcinogen that actually reacts with crucial molecules in target cells. With the exception of the very chemically reactive alky-lating agents, which are activated in aqueous solution at physiologic pH (e.g., N-methyl-N-nitrosourea), and the agents that intercalate...

Review Of Published Prognostic Models In Breast Cancer Methodology

Papers were sought that presented new prognostic models for patients with operable breast cancer, or which evaluated a previously published model (validation study), or both of these. Medline , Embase , CancerLit , and other databases were searched late in 2001 (2). Some additional articles were identified after the main searches.

Colon Cancer as an Example of Inflammatory Induced Cancer

Moreover, the production of sIL-6R as well as IL-6 trans-signaling processes play a dominant role in tumor cell growth. Interestingly, crosstalk between the TGFp and IL-6 pathway was demonstrated (Fig. 3). Inhibition of TGFp production resulted in an increased IL-6 production in mice. Surprisingly, the IL-6 overproduction is accompanied by a loss of membrane bound IL-6R from the cell surface of epithelial cells within tumor lesions. This loss of membrane bound IL-6R was most likely due to an increase of the cell surface expression of the protease ADAM17, which is responsible for cleavage of the IL-6R (Matthews et al. 2003). As the epithelial tumor growth could be inhibited either by a neutralizing antibody directed against the IL-6R or by sgp130Fc, we concluded that the growth of the tumor was promoted by IL-6 trans-signaling but not by the classic signaling via the membrane-bound IL-6R (Becker et al. 2004, 2005). The same observations of downregulation of the IL-6R on the surface of...

To Anticancer Therapy

In addition to paraneoplastic vasculitides or malignancies following systemic vasculitides, adverse reactions to anticancer therapy can lead to vasculitis. The case-reports include instances of arteritis following radiation 42 , vasculitis following bonemarrow transplantation 43, 44 , tamoxifen-associated vasculitis 45 and vasculitis arising during intrahepatic chemotherapy 46 . A recent review of 117 patients receiving intrahepatic chemotherapy for liver tumors over a 2-year period in Italy revealed 9 cases (7.7 ) of toxic arteritis due to chemoembolization. Seven of these patients had arterial stenosis, 2 patients thrombosis related to toxic arteritis due to chemoembolization 47 ,

Cancer Immunoediting

Although strong evidence has been presented supporting the existence of a functional cancer immune surveillance process against cancer in mice and humans, cancer continues to develop in intact immune systems and is refractory to many treatment approaches. These findings might be caused by the failure of early host tumor immunity to eradicate nascent transformed cells. Even in the presence of continued immune pressure, the failure to eradicate tumor cells results in tumor progression with reduced immunogenicity. Cancer immunoediting has been proposed in terms of the dual functions of host immunity not only for eliminating tumor cells but also for shaping malignant disease during the period of equilibrium between the tumor and host. Elimination is the hallmark of the original concept in cancer immune surveillance for the successful eradication of developing tumor cells, working in concert with the intrinsic tumor suppressor mechanisms of the nonimmunogenic surveillance processes. The...

Derived From Cancer Cells

Cancer Cells Produce Chemokines Early Observations From Chemokines and Cancer Edited by B. J. Rollins Humana Press Inc., Totowa, NJ The example of the MG-63 tumor cell line as a cytokine source might be extreme, but it nonetheless clearly illustrates that one particular tumor may produce many chemokines and cytokines simultaneously, presumably through the action of common second-messenger pathways and shared transcription factors. This example also shows that the expression of C-X-C and C-C chemokines in tumor biology are not mutually exclusive, which implies that TAMs, TANs, and TALys may coincide in individual tumors. Although this section emphasizes the structures and biologic functions of the C-C chemokines in cancer, the interrelations with the C-X-C and other chemoattractants such as lymphotactins, complement factors, and virus-encoded peptides (2,5,65) must be kept in mind. The simultaneous production of various chemokines by cancer cells and the interrelation in vivo is...

Cellular Senescence And Cancer

Much of the evidence that links cellular senescence and tumor suppression derives from studies of cells in culture. Nonetheless, there is substantial supporting evidence from studies of intact organisms. Perhaps the best evidence derives from mice in which genes encoding p53 or INK4a proteins have been inactivated in the germ line. The INK4a locus encodes the p16 CDKI, as well as p14 ARF, a protein that is derived from an alternative reading frame and indirectly regulates p53 stability (145,146,153). Cells derived from animals that lack a functional INK4a locus fail to senesce in response to multiple stimuli. In all cases, the animals develop cancer at an early age (154). Similarly, p53 - - mice are composed of cells that re sist or fail to respond to senescence signals, and these animals are highly cancer prone (155-157). By contrast, a genetic manipulation that causes mammary epithelial cells to undergo premature replicative senescence suppresses the development of breast cancer in...

Pharmacogenomic Testing Of Cancer For Targeting Drugs

Current advancements in pharmacogenomics are anticipated to lead toward a tailored cancer therapy targeting specific molecules that cause particular tumors (12). Target drugs pro- Target Drugs to Specific Genes for Cancer Therapy Target Drugs to Specific Genes for Cancer Therapy Cancer

Improvement of Cancer Preventive Efficacy by Additional Use of Other Food Factors

Besides hydrocarbon carotenoids, some xantho-phylls such as P-cryptoxanthin are also found to be lower in the blood of liver cancer patients with viral hepatitis than in healthy individuals (Jinno et al. 1997). Therefore, additional use of P-cryptoxanthin may improve the efficacy for liver cancer prevention. We have also found experimentally that myo-inositol may be useful for the prevention of liver carcinogenesis. Since myo-inositol has been known to prevent fatty liver as well as cancer in several organs, such as colon, we evaluated the effect of oral administration of myo-inositol using the experimental model of spontaneous liver carcinogenesis in C3H He male mice (Nishino et al. 1999). The mean number of liver tumors was significantly decreased by myo-inositol treatment as compared with that in the control group the control group developed 7.82 tumors mouse, whereas the 1 myo-inositol-treated group had 0.77 tumors mouse (p< 0.01, Student's t-test).

Cancer Cells Are Immortal

The difference between cancer cells and normal cells is profound, not only because of the way they look and the way they behave, but because of the radical difference in their lifespans. Placed in tissue culture, cancer cells can live forever. Normal cells, on the other hand, die after about 50 generations. The best proof of cancer cell immortality comes from HeLa cells, a cultured cancer cell line that was established in 1951 from a cervical tumor that was isolated from a woman named Henrietta Lacks. The HeLa cell line has been growing well ever since, and cultures of these cells are maintained for research purposes by laboratories around to world. Henrietta Lacks, a native of Baltimore, Maryland, was 31 years old when the tumor was discovered. She died of cervical cancer eight months later. For 40 years scientists struggled to understand the mechanism by which cancer cells are immortalized. Throughout the 1990s attention was drawn to a special DNA sequence called a telomere, located...

Interaction of Chemical Carcinogens with Oncogenes and Tumor Suppressor Genes

Cellular oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes are two of the critical DNA targets for chemical carcinogens, leading to activation of oncogenes and the inactivation of suppressor genes. This will be discussed further in Chapter 5, but a few examples will be given here. Carcinogens can activate cellular oncogenes (proto-oncogenes) by a variety of mechanisms including base substitution (point) mutations, chromosomal translocations, and gene amplification. One fairly common example is the activation of ras proto-oncogenes by chemical and physical carcinogens in both cultured mammalian cells and animal models (reviewed in Ref. 24). H-ras and K-ras proto-oncogene mutations, for example, have been observed in rodent models of skin, liver, lung, and mammary carcinogenesis. The observed mutations in the tumors correlate with expected base adducts formed by the carcinogen G A base transitions with alkylating agents (e.g., NMU and MNNG), G T transversions for benzo(a)pyrene, A T transversions...

The Importance of Functional Assessment in Advanced Cancer and Cachexia

It goes without saying that the best way to treat cancer cachexia is to treat successfully the patient's cancer. For some patients oncological therapy may be influenced by chronological age 45,46 . However, it is often recognised that physiological age is perhaps more important. Functional assessment may provide one measure of this robustness and contribute to the shift in medical treatment delivery away from being unduly governed by chronological age and towards a greater use of markers of 'biological age' or risk. Understanding the relationship, therefore, between functional status and overall patient 'fitness' and 'reserve' is important. Unfortunately, for many of patients with advanced solid malignancy, progression of disease occurs despite active oncological therapy. At this point patients have often been weakened by the catabolic side-effects of anti-cancer therapy and their low performance status requires that any anti-cachexia therapy is non-toxic and will improve function....

Impact Of Imaging Diagnostics On Cancer In Relation With Tumor Markers

Tumor biomarkers have improved with time for prognosis and monitoring purposes mainly, but for earlier detection and risk assessment their development have not yet reached a level adequate for clinical applications. In the past two decades, noninvasive imaging technology based on various platforms for cancer diagnostics has made significant advances with the surrounding computer-aided technologies, not only for clinical applications but also for basic research (13). In the case of lung cancer, early detection is needed to improve prognosis because most cancers are metastasized when first detected by biomarkers or by cytological assessment of sputum. Mass screening for lung cancer with low-dose X-ray spiral computerized tomography (CT) in mobile units was performed on 5483 individuals from the general population in Japan (13). The detection rate with CT was 0.48 , including cancers of less then 10 mm in diameter, whereas that of standard mass screenings done previously in the same area...

Carcinogen Induced Epigenetic Changes

Even though the application of Ockham's (or Occam's) razor to the effects of chemical carcinogens leads to the concept that the genotoxic results of carcinogen-DNA binding are the simplest, most straightforward explanation for their carcinogenicity, a number of important epigenetic effects are also observed. For example, changes in gene expression patterns caused by carcinogen-induced epigenetic alterations such as changes in DNA methylation or histone acetylation have been observed after exposure of cells to carcinogens. This pattern has been observed, for example, during cells' exposure to the carcinogenic metals nickel, cadmium, or arsenic.7 The carcinogenic effects of nickel have been linked to DNA hypermethylation and histone deacetyla-tion, both of which can alter chromatin structure and cause epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (see Chapter 5).

Importance of gene amplification in breast cancer

Recent studies using combination of cDNA array based expression profiling and comparative genomic hybridization have elucidated the role of gene amplification in the transcriptional program of breast cancer. In the study by Pollack et al. (2), copy number alteration and expression levels across 6691 mapped human genes were examined in 44 locally advanced breast cancer and 10 breast cancer cell lines. The data from this study suggest that at least 12 of all the variation in gene expression among the breast cancer is directly attributable to underlying variation in gene copy numbers. The total number of genomic alterations (gains and losses) correlated significantly with high grade (p 0.008), negative estrogen receptor (ER) (p 0.04), andp53 mutation (p 0.0006). Of 117 high-level amplifications (representing 91 different genes), 62 (representing 54 genes) were found to be associated with at least moderately elevated mRNA levels, and 42 (representing 36 different genes) with highly...

All cancers154118231980

Carcinomas of the lung, breast, colon, rectum, and bladder constitute nearly 50 of all cancers at all ages 19 , but are all uncommon in adolescents and young adults. However, examples of all of these carcinomas are seen, and the rates increase from the 13- to 14-year age group to the 20- to 24-year-olds. The rates for carcinomas of the genitourinary tract show a marked increase across the three age groups. Genitourinary tract carcinomas comprise 18 of all carcinomas in 13- to 14-year olds, but 21 and 42 in the 15- to 19-year-olds and 20- to 24-year-olds, respectively. All sites within the genitourinary tract show increases with age, There are also marked differences in the incidences of certain cancers in this age group by gender, ethnicity, and country that are described in more detail elsewhere 23, 24 . Ethnic racial differences in incidence are particularly apparent between African-American and non-Hispanic white adolescents and young adults. For example, among 15 to 19-year-olds...

Mechanisms Of Interaction Of Aging And Carcinogenesis

Cancer is a common denomination given to a number of different diseases. Common features to all cancers include 23,68 potential immortality of cancer cells due to avoiding apoptosis ability to invade surrounding tissues due to reduced sensitivity to signals from neighboring cells aimed to offset proliferation cell de-differentiation with re-appearance of some embryonal proteins (e.g. a-fetoprotein) in cytoplasm growth signals autonomy, which allows cancer cells to proliferate in absence of outside signals due to only inner growth signals release of growth factors and promotion of angiogenesis in tissue, which favor tumor growth and metastasis increase in metabolism and number of mitochondria in cancer cells key genetic events leading to cancer development , , . Down regulation of apoptosis gene, p53, as well as upregulation of myc and ras genes, which may favor excessive proliferation, could be examples of such events 69,70. Both carcinogenesis and aging are associated with genomic...

Experimental Models for the Study of Carcinogenesis

A number of models for the study of carcino-genesis have been developed over the years. Historically, two of the most useful ones have been the initiation-promotion model of mouse skin carcinogenesis (the skin-painting model) and the induction of liver cancers in rats. The classic model of carcinogenesis is the single application of an initiating agent such as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon followed by the continuous application of a promoting agent like TPA to the backs of shaved mice. Much of what we know about tumor initiation, promotion, and progression has come from this model system. Initiation and promotion during mouse skin carcinogenesis produce multiple benign squamous papillomas. A few squamous cell carcinomas eventually arise from the papillomas over many months. However, malignant conversion can be speeded up by exposure of papilloma-bearing mice to mutagens, which activates oncogenes such as H-ra.s and causes loss of tumor suppressor genes such as p53, as noted above....

The Changing Role of the Pathologist in the Management of the Cancer Patient

The experienced surgical pathologist routinely uses paraffin embedded tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin (H& E) to establish the correct cancer diagnosis. A number of circumstances arise, however, in which the H& E slide is insufficient to establish the correct diagnosis. This occurs in approx 4-10 of all tumors and is usually owing to the fact that the tumors are undifferentiated and the cell of origin remains elusive. These undifferentiated tumors tend to fall into three categories A second circumstance is the tumor presents as a metastasis with an uncertain origin. Often these tumors are poorly differentiated adenocarcinomas in which the organ of origin cannot be ascertained from the histological pattern of the metastasis. Approximately 20 of all cancer patients present with metastasis. Studies have revealed that in as many as 4 of these patients the primary cancer is never found, even with complete autopsy examination. From Cancer Diagnostics Current and Future Trends...

Irradiation Carcinogenesis

A number of the points made about chemical carcinogenesis are also true for radiation-induced carcinogenesis. Both X-rays and ultraviolet (UV) radiation, for example, produce damage to DNA. As with chemical carcinogens, this damage induces DNA repair processes, some of which are error prone and may lead to mutations. The development of malignant transformation in cultured cells after irradiation requires cell proliferation to ''fix'' the initial damage into a heritable change and then to allow clonal proliferation and expression of the typical transformed phenotype.105 Fixation appears to be complete after the first postirradiation mitotic cycle. In the case of mouse C3H 10 T 1 2 cells, expression of radiation-induced transformation requires an additional 12 rounds of cell division. Thus, as in the case of chemical carcinogenesis, a promotion phase is required for full expression of the initiated malignant alteration. Moreover, when low doses of chemical carcinogens and X-rays are...

Colon Cancer Prevention Studies with Nonselective NSAIDs

Throughout the 1990s, data from cancer epidemiology strongly supported a role for NSAIDs in colorectal cancer prevention. Large studies found that frequent NSAID use was associated with an approximately 50 reduction in prema-lignant adenomas, carcinomas, and even death due to colorectal cancer (Hawk et al. 2004). Animal colon cancer models, both genetic and carcinogen-induced, also showed this relationship. Dr. Waddell's initial observation was confirmed in prospective randomized trials of sulindac for management of patients with FAP (Giardiello et al. 1993 Labayle et al. 1991). These studies documented treatment-associated regression of pre-existing adenomas in FAP patients using sulindac, with this response achieved in approximately 30 of patients over 6 months of treatment. The next goal was to apply this finding to prevention of sporadic disease. Unfortunately, sulindac was poorly tolerated during long-term administration, with many patients experiencing gastrointestinal upset and...

Breast cancer activism and consensus politics

Since the early 1990s 'lay' or 'patient' activism has had a profound and lasting impact in raising the public profile of breast cancer in Euro-American contexts (Kaufert 1998 Klawiter 2000, 2004). Although activism in relation to a range of health issues pertaining to women, particularly contraception and abortion, can be traced to the early 20th century (Weisman 1998), the recent upsurge in activities and interest in breast cancer is, in part, a legacy of the feminist politics of the 1970s and the successful lobbying activities of AIDS activist groups in the 1990s (Morgen 2002). Nevertheless, as Epstein points out, it is now the scope and reach of a culture of breast cancer activism which is informing and cross cutting the recent rapid growth in a diverse range of patient movements and lay groups active around the politics of health (2007). On the one hand, the recent visibility of a culture of activism around breast cancer has helped shape state or government instigated preventative...

Breast Cancer Activists

The Washington-based National Breast Cancer Coalition and the San Francisco-based Breast Cancer Action (by the mid 1990s the most influential advocacy groups involved in breast cancer politics at the national level) cautioned against the widespread availability of the new technology. They worried that the risk information generated by BRCA testing would provide ambiguous results, because of the risk, rather than certainty, of future disease incidence and the paucity of medical management options available. Therefore, both suggested that testing be offered in a highly regulated manner and only in conjunction with extensive clinical care. In fact, the Representatives of these patient advocacy groups began to express such opinions almost as soon as the BRCA gene discoveries were announced. In a front-page New York Times article announcing the BRCA gene discovery, Nancy Evans, president of BCA, noted It's a very mixed blessing to have this knowledge . . . it's the first step in a long...

Oxygen Free Radicals Aging And Cancer

The diseases of aging include cardiovascular disease, decline in function of the immune system, brain dysfunction, and cancer. People living in the United States who are 65 or older have 10 times the risk of those under age 65 for developing cancer. Part of the increase in cancer incidence with aging could be due to an accumulation of damage to DNA over a lifetime of exposure to carcinogenic substances. Another, perhaps more likely, possibility is that cellular damage produced by endogenous oxidants accumulates over time and the body's ability to repair this damage

Cancer and the Cell Cycle

Typically, cancer cells lose one or more of their checkpoint monitors, so they divide whether things are right or not. This is the reason they develop an abnormal genome and physical appearance. Corrupting the genome in this way may seem to spell certain death for a cell, but it is really the means by which cancer cells reinvent themselves. The checkpoints are intended to maintain the status quo without them the genetic profile of a cell, including which genes are on or off and which are mutated, can change very quickly and radically. The T cells of our immune system can detect abnormal, potentially dangerous cells, and when they do they order those cells to commit suicide. The gross changes in a cancer cell's genetic structure, however, often knock out its ability to respond to those signals. When this happens, the cancer cell has gained immunity to apoptosis and is well on its way to fulfilling its quest for immortality and assuming the lifestyle enjoyed by its protozoan ancestors.

Niche for Normal and Cancer Stem Cells

An important issue in cancer therapy is the presence of a population that is resistant to anticancer treatment. This resistance has been partly ascribed to the presence of quiescent stem cells in a cancer population. However, how the quiescent state is induced in a proliferating cancer population is totally obscure. We think that our study on the stem cell system of pigment cells will provide some insight into the molecular basis for cancer stem cells, because the quiescent melanocyte stem cell would be the ideal model for understanding the process generating quiescent stem cells. In this article, we review our latest understanding of the quiescent stem cells of the melanocyte lineage by referring to some related topics of cancer stem cells. The main purpose of this symposium is to discuss cancer stem cells (Clarke et al. 2006). While the cancer stem cell is not the direct subject of our study, we agree that the cancer stem cell is a notion that may have the potential to...

Optimizing Risks and Benefits of Selective Cox2 Inhibitors for Colorectal Cancer Prevention

At the time of this writing, final data reporting the efficacy of selective Cox-2 inhibitors for colorectal cancer prevention have not yet been published. Fortunately, these studies were all near completion at the time that drug-associated increased cardiovascular risk was identified. As In the short term, the continued use of the selective Cox-2 inhibitors for cancer chemopre-vention will depend upon the balance of risks and benefits revealed in these studies. Balancing risks and benefits is a complicated process, and one that must be approached with caution. It is important to remember that the currently available studies were designed to assess prevention of colorectal adenomas, not to determine the cardiovascular effects of selective Cox-2 inhibitors. In considering the anticipated data, it stands to reason that individuals with the highest risk of colorectal neoplasia and the lowest risk of cardiovascular disease will benefit most from selective Cox-2 inhibitors. There are,...

Nk Cell Trafficking And Cancer Any Relevance

Since the early 1980s, the adoptive transfer of LAK cells or tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) has been performed in a series of cancer patients, resulting in a low but significant proportion of clinical responses, especially in those with renal cell carcinoma and melanoma (35). Critical to the activity of these systemically transferred effector cells is their localization to tumor sites. However, for the most part, the proportion of LAK and TIL cells capable of penetrating tumor tissues is quite small, consistent with several early lymphocyte trafficking studies demonstrating that highly activated T- and mononuclear cells migrate poorly into peripheral tissues and tend to localize in various organs and lymphatic tissues (35). Overall, the biologic significance of NK cells as antitumor effector cells remains unproven. Their potent tumoricidal activities in vitro suggest that these cells would be capable of fighting established tumors in vivo. Furthermore, the incidence of cancers...

Clients Journey through the Breast Cancer Activists System

All benefits and risks of genetic susceptibility testing. . . .4 Neither organization specified where this counseling should take place or how it should be conducted. They did not specify, for example, that such counseling be offered by a specially trained geneticist and thus did not take an explicit position in the debate that had been raging for years over whether non-specialists in genetics could provide counseling. However, one might easily assume that both imagined a counseling session that included information about the limitations and implications of the test for clients concerned about cancer risk and their families.5 After the genes were analyzed, the client returned to the clinic on an ongoing basis for post-test counseling and long-term follow-up.10 Both groups were careful, however, to note that both counseling and laboratory services should remain confidential unless the client decided otherwise. BCA urged that the array and number of unresolved issues related to genetic...

Genetic Susceptibility And Cancer

As was noted above, there are a number of inherited cancer susceptibility gene mutations, such as xeroderma pigmentosum, Fanconi's anemia, and ataxia telangiectasia. These types of inherited defects that lead to cancer are generally caused by a deficiency in DNA repair pathways. Almost certainly we have only scratched the surface of inherited cancer susceptibility genes that make an individual more prone to developing cancer. Other susceptibility genes may include alterations in the metabolic enzymes that metabolize drugs and environmental toxins, polymorphisms in genes that regulate utilization of certain essential nutrients such as folic acid, or inherited mutations in tumor suppressor genes. The completion of the Human Genome Project allows a systematic approach to discovering the genetic alterations that make individuals prone to developing various diseases. The Environmental Genome Project is producing a catalogue of variation in genes involved in catabolizing toxins, nutrient...

Multiple Mutations In Cancer

In most cases, it takes years for a full-blown invasive, metastatic cancer to develop from a small clone of initiated cells. This process might take 20 years or more, during which time an There is evidence for the accumulation of thousands of mutations in cancer cells derived from human tumors. For example, examination of the colon tumor-derived DNA from patients with hereditary non-polyposis colon cancer (HNPCC) reveals that as many as 100,000 repetitive DNA sequences are altered from the mismatch DNA repair defects that these patients' cells harbor (reviewed in Reference 122). Mismatch repair defects have also been noted in ''sporadic'' (not known to be hereditary) cancers. As noted earlier, one hypothesis explaining the genetic instability of transformed cells is the mutator phenotype hypothesis, championed by Loeb and colleagues.122 This hypothesis states that an ''initial mutator gene mutation generates further mutations including mutations in additional genetic stability genes,...

History Of Mononuclear Cell Infiltration In Cancer

Mononuclear cell infiltration is a common feature of many types of human cancers. In fact, its occurrence is considered so unremarkable that there are no systematic studies describing the prevalence or intensity of infiltrates by tumor type or stage. Instead, it is generally asserted that intense infiltrates are associated with certain tumor types, such as medullary carcinoma of the breast and malignant melanoma (1,2), and that most other cancers are also infiltrated to differing extents. Even without an epidemiology of tumor-related inflammatory infiltrates, tumor biologists have extensively focused on this phenomenon for more than 100 yr. Leukocyte infiltration in cancer has been appreciated since the beginning of microscopic analyses of human tumors, but controversy surrounded the question of its origin and the causal relationship in which it stands to carcinogenesis. Virchow (3) first described the association of inflammatory cells with human tumors and inferred that cancers arose...

Genomic Aberrations in Cancer

Almost 100,000 neoplasia-associated chromosomal abnormalities have been characterized at the molecular level, revealing previously unknown genes that are closely associated with tumourigenesis. It is not clear if somatic chromosomal aberrations and genomic syndromes share any common mechanisms, such as mediation by segmental duplications, although this is a possibility. Prospects for informatic and laboratory study of chromosomal aberrations in cancer are assisted by the availability of a centralized database to capture this data, the Mitelman map of chromosome aberrations in cancer. This resource has been integrated into the NCBI MapViewer tool and the Cancer Genome Anatomy Project (CGAP) (see Table 3.1).

Role of Viruses in the Causation of Human Cancer

To prove a causal relationship between a putative cancer-causing virus and human cancer is not a simple task. Such proof relies on evidence that is to a fair extent circumstantial. This evidence includes (1) epidemiological data showing a correlation between living in an area of endemic viral infection and a type ofcancer (2) serological evidence of antibody titers to viral antigens in patients with a given cancer type (3) evidence for insertion of viral DNA into a cancer-bearing host's cell genome (4) evidence for a consistent chromosomal translocation, particularly those involving an oncogene, in virally infected patients (5) data showing that viral infection of cells in culture or transfection of viral genes into cells causes cell transformation and the ability of such cells to produce tumors in nude mice and (6) development of cancers of the suspected target organ in transgenic mice produced by embryonic gene transfer of viral genes. On the basis of this sort of evidence, some...

Cooperative Group and cancer center Limitations

Pediatric and adult cooperative groups and cancer centers may not allow the enrollment of adolescent and young adults onto clinical trials because of restrictive eligibility criteria. A clinical trial may not be available. Adult cooperative groups and cancer centers may lack treatment protocols for younger patients. Pediatric cooperative groups and hospitals may lack treatment protocols for older patients. Clinical trials for the types of cancer that predominate among adolescents and young adults may not be a priority of the cooperative group enterprise.

Why the lack of Progress in Older Adolescents and Young adults with cancer

Comparison in males and females with invasive cancer of average annual percent change from 1975 to 1997 in the 5-year survival rate (United States SEER program). Modified from Bleyer 26 Correlation of national cancer mortality rate reduction in the United States as a function of age at death, with the rate of improvement in survival duration as a function of age at diagnosis (data from the United States Census Bureau and United States SEER program) spiritual, economic financial, and social factors. Biologic factors include the unique physiologic and pharmacologic characteristics of adolescent and young adult patients and their cancers. The health-care profession explanation includes a lack of awareness by general healthcare providers and of training, knowledge, and experience by oncology specialists. There is no other age during which the time to diagnosis is longer, fewer tumor specimens are available for transla-tional research, or clinical trial participation is lower 11 . The...

Breast Stem Cells and Cancer

Breast Biology Group, School of Cancer and Imaging Sciences, Faculty of Medicine and Human Sciences, University of Manchester, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Wilmslow Road, M20 4BX Manchester, UK email robert.clarke manchester.ac.uk Abstract. Recent results have increased our understanding of normal stem cells and the signalling pathways which regulate them during the development of the mammary gland. Tumours in many tissues are now thought to develop from dysregulated stem cells and depend on activated stem cell self-renewal pathways such as Notch for their tumourigenic capacity. These cancer stem cells are recognised by specific cell surface proteins that they express and their capacity to grow tumours in vivo or spheres in vitro. We have described human breast DCIS mammospheres grown from cancer stem cells and demonstrated their dependence on the EGF and Notch receptor pathways. Stem cell self-renewal pathways such as these may represent novel therapeutic targets to...

Cancers Develop from a Single Bad Cell

Cancer cells within a tumor are like any other living community in that they are subject to the same laws of natural selection. Most cancer cells die spontaneously because their genome has been so badly corrupted that they are incapable of maintaining basic housekeeping functions. Of those that survive, one may have a genetic profile that favors rapid growth, so much so that it quickly becomes the only cell type within the tumor. This scenario has been confirmed experimentally by examining characteristics of cancer cells isolated from different regions of a single individual's body. For example, certain forms of leukemia are associated with the presence of the Philadelphia chromosome, created by a translocation between the long arms of chromosomes 9 and 22 (described in chapter 2). Detailed sequence analysis of the DNA spanning the break site shows it is identical in all leukemic cells from a single patient, confirming a common ancestry. In other words, the leukemia cells in that...

Chromatin As A Target For The Dnabinding Anticancer Drugs

Abstract Chemotherapy has been a major approach to treat cancer. Both constituents of chromatin, chromosomal DNA and the associated chromosomal histone proteins are the molecular targets of the anticancer drugs. Small DNA binding ligands, which inhibit enzymatic processes with DNA substrate, are well known in cancer chemotherapy. These drugs inhibit the polymerase and topoisomerase activity. With the advent in the knowledge of chromatin chemistry and biology, attempts have shifted from studies of the structural basis of the association of these drugs or small ligands (with the potential of drugs) with DNA to their association with chromatin and nucleosome. These drugs often inhibit the expression of specific genes leading to a series of biochemical events. An overview will be given about the latest understanding of the molecular basis of their action. We shall restrict to those drugs, synthetic or natural, whose prime cellular targets are so far known to be chromosomal DNA The history...

Clinical Breast Cancer Genetics Patients Practitioners and Predictive Medicine

Since the late 1990's NHS genetic services, in particular clinical cancer genetics, have increasingly become prime targets for government sponsored research and investment. In April 2001, the then Secretary of State for Health gave a speech setting out the government's commitment to support an expanding genetics service in NHS, announcing a package of new investment (Milburn 2001). Ten months before that in the government's National Cancer Plan cancer genetics was highlighted as key site for investment linked, as the following extract indicates, to the rationality of 'patient' centred and 'preventative' health care Over the coming years our expanding knowledge of cancer genetics will have a major impact on our ability to predict an individual's level of risk of developing cancer, our ability to detect and diagnose cancer early and our ability to select treatments which are most likely to be effective. Ultimately the genetic revolution may lead to ways of preventing cancer (2000 89)....

Cancer Is a Global Problem

Cancer is clearly a worldwide problem. The incidence and mortality rates for various cancers are similar, though not identical, among developed countries. In the developing world, as countries become more westernized and their populations achieve longer life expectancy, cancer rates are increasing. Although there are differ ences among developing and developed countries in the incidence rates of certain cancers, lung cancer is the most common cancer among men in both regions of the world and breast cancer is the most common cancer in women (Fig. 3-4).5 There are, however, regional differences in the distribution of various cancers in different regions of the world that reflect differing etiologic factors. For example, infectious etiology plays a greater role in certain parts of the world, e.g., the role of schistosomiasis infections in causing bladder cancer in parts of Africa and that of hepatitis B infections in liver cancer in China Figure 3-3. Estimated number of new cancer cases...

Dna As Target For Anticancer Drugs

The structure of the DNA molecule makes it an extremely versatile target for anticancer drugs. It has a negatively charged phosphate backbone, hydrogen accepting and donating functional groups from the bases in the major and minor grooves, phosphate oxygen atoms and aromatic hydrophobic components of the bases able to promote van der Waals interactions. DNA is polymorphic, and has been observed in several different conformations (e.g. A, B, Z etc.) that differ in the geometry of the double helix, including the depth and width of major and minor grooves (Saenger, 1984). The groove shapes and hydration patterns in a particular conformation are also sequence dependent to certain extent. Along with these, the molecule of DNA also has several levels of structural organization. The most basic level is the primary base sequence. The roll, tilt and twist from one base pair to the next in the double strand depend on the base, thereby giving rise to sequence dependent microheterogeneity in the...

Collagen Dissolving in Cancer Local Growth of Cancer

Software of a liver cell reprogrammed to be a cancer cell. This means 1. Characteristic of cancer uncontrolled cell multiplication 2. Characteristic of cancer Mass production of collagen-dissolving enzymes Cancer cells (green) Software of a liver cell reprogrammed to be a cancer cell. This means 1. Characteristic of cancer uncontrolled cell multiplication 2. Characteristic of cancer Mass production of collagen-dissolving enzymes

Leptin and Cancer Anorexia Cachexia

Progressive wasting is common in many types of cancer and is one of the most important factors leading to death in cancer patients. Weight loss is a potent stimulus to food intake in normal humans and animals. The persistence of anorexia and the onset of cachexia in cancer patients, therefore, implies a failure of this adaptive feeding response 86 . Leptin, a member of the gp 130 family of cytokines, induces a strong T helper-1 lymphocyte response and is regarded as a proin-flammatory inducer 87 . Several data suggested a role of leptin in inflammatory diseases. Proinflammatory cytokines up-regulate leptin expression in white adipose tissue and increase plasma leptin levels in hamsters and mice 88 . However, in many common diseases associated with cachexia, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and chronic inflammatory bowel disease, there is an inflammatory status caused by high proinflammatory cytokine levels, whereby leptin concentrations are decreased related to body fat...

Prostate Cancer Stem Cells A Target for New Therapies

Department of Biology, YCR Cancer Research Unit, University of York, Y010 5YW York, UK email njm9 york.ac.uk 1.1 Prostate Cancer Therapy A Historical View 156 2 Transgenic Mouse Models of Prostate Cancer 157 3 Prostate Cancer A Disease of Epithelial Differentiation 157 6 The Origins of Prostate Cancer 161 7 Isolation of Prostate Cancer Stem Cells 163 8 Gene Expression in Prostate Cancer Stem Cells 167 9 Implications for Prostate Cancer Therapy 170 Abstract. Prostate cancer is now a common disease in men over 50 years of age. Medical therapies for prostate cancer are based on discoveries from the mid-twentieth century, and in the long term are rarely curative. Most treatments are directed towards an androgen receptor-expressing, highly proliferative target cell, which does indeed form the vast majority of cells in a prostate tumour. However, by invoking the existence of a cancer stem cell which, like normal epithelial stem cells in the prostate, does not express androgen receptor and...

Cancer And Cancer Metastasisrelated Genes

The metastatic spread of tumours is the single, most important factor that affects cancer patient mortality rate gradually, new oncogenes are being implicated in playing a role as promotors of metastatic events rather than initial oncogenesis itself. Such genes may become potential targets for anti-metastatic therapies in the future. The aim of this chapter is thus to present a brief overview of some of the major oncogenic regulators of tumour development and spread.

Aging and the Incidence of Cancer

Human cancer is primarily an age-related disease that strikes when an individual is 50 years of age or older. The age of the individual and the time element are important largely because the formation of a tumor is a multistep process that takes many years to complete. There are, how ever, many exceptions to the age-cancer relationship. Lung cancer brought on by cigarette smoke and childhood leukemias are the most notable examples. The chemicals in cigarette smoke are known to accelerate tumor formation, but the factors responsible for cancer acceleration in children are still unclear. Cancers are age-related because our cells change with time, becoming more susceptible to genetic damage and less capable of dealing with the damage when it does occur. This problem is believed to be due, in large measure, to a reduction in the ability of our immune system to track down and destroy abnormal cells as they appear the body's diminished immune response gives those cells time to evolve into a...

Early Detection of Ovarian Cancer Rationale

When ovarian cancer has not spread beyond the ovaries (stage I), up to 90 of patients can be cured with currently available surgery and chemotherapy. By contrast, disease that has spread from the pelvis (stages III-IV) can be cured in only 30 or less. At present, only 25 of ovarian cancers are diagnosed in stage I. Detection of a larger fraction of patients in stage I might impact favorably on survival. Given the prevalence of ovarian cancer, there are stringent requirements for an effective screening strategy. As diagnosis of ovarian cancer is generally made at surgery, a positive predictive value of 10 implies ten operations for each case of ovarian cancer diagnosed. To achieve a positive predictive value of 10 with a prevalence of 1 in 2,500 requires a high sensitivity of 75 or greater for early-stage disease and a very high specificity of 99.6 . Approaches to Screening for Epithelial Ovarian Cancer Three approaches have been utilized for early detection of ovarian cancer...

Dna Secondary Structures As Targets For Anticancer Drugs

DNA secondary structures containing stretches of single stranded DNA are present in the human genome and are involved in the regulation of crucial processes such as transcription. Hairpins or cruciforms are the potential recognition sites for binding of transcription factors. Of equal importance are telomeres, the DNAprotein complexes marking the ends of chromosomes. Facile interconversion between double and single stranded DNA and G-quadruplex at physiological conditions renders these secondary DNA structures attractive candidates for biological signaling molecules and consequently, potential targets for anticancer agents.

Lung Cancer As A Model System

We have chosen lung cancer as a model in which to investigate the association of antinuclear antibodies and oncogenesis for a number of reasons. First, lung cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer in the world, and is the most common cause of cancer deaths in men and women in the US and worldwide, representing 28 of all cancer deaths in the US 44 , The majority of people with lung cancer will die within 1 year of its detection. This high mortality rate can in part be attributed to lack of diagnostic methods that allow early detection. New molecular markers, such as autoantibodies to a defined set of antigens, that lead to an earlier diagnosis and treatment are likely to improve survival. Second, one of the mutagens in cigarette smoke has been identified as the prime etiologic factor responsible for the disease. There is good evidence that exposure to a particular mutagen gives rise to molecular lesions characteristic of that mutagen. Tobacco-specific TV-nitrosamines are known...

Urinary Bladder Cancer

Bladder cancer is the ninth-most common malignancy in the world.35 There are 330,000 new cases and 130,000 deaths each year. In the United States alone there are over 63,000 new cases annually and 13,000 deaths.3 Smoking is the greatest risk factor and is estimated to be a causative factor in 65 of males and 30 females in some developed countries. Historically, some types of bladder cancer were associated with abuse of analgesic combinations containing phenacetin and occupational exposure in the aniline dye industry (e.g., exposure to 2-naphthylamine). In Egypt and some other African nations, chronic bladder infections with Shistosoma haematodium are a risk factor. Bladder cancer is treated by surgical removal if disease is invasive. Superficial, localized cancers can be treated by local instillation of immunomodulatory agents (e.g., bacilli Calmette-Guerin BCG ) or chemotherapy. Chemotherapy and or radiation therapy have been used as an adjuant or neo-adjuant (before surgery) to...

New Approach To Identifying Informative Autoantibodies Associated With Lung Cancer

Recently, construction of tumor cell cDNA libraries and screening using autologous host sera (SEREX) has revealed that a B-cell response to tumor antigens is more prevalent than previously observed 28-32 , The success of this methodology is likely attributable to enriching for cDNA expressed by the autologous tumor. This enrichment no doubt facilitates the identification and cloning of antigens corresponding to autoantibodies in the autologous sera, which may be relatively rare or nonexistent in expression libraries made from cancer cell lines or other nonautologous cells. This established method may also preferentially identify autoantigens that are overexpressed, rather than mutated, in tumor cells. Indeed, while SEREX has identified some mutational antigens, the majority of SEREX antigens appear to be overexpressed, but otherwise normal antigens 32 , In addition, SEREX methodology alone does not select for antigens that are oncogenic. We have devised an alternative strategy to...

Is Fimbrin Involved in Cancer

The potential of fimbrin to modulate cell behaviour is obviously quite considerable. There are references in the literature since the early 1980s that fimbrin expression increases with cell transformation, especially in fibroblast cells. However, little incisive investigation seems to have been carried out. More recent investigations have pursued the worthwhile aim of establishing a role for fimbrin in neoplastic transformation and tumour progression. The expression of L-fimbrin has been investigated in cell lines derived from carcinoma of the prostate. L-fimbrin has been found in many carcinoma cell lines, but not in normal epithelial cell lines derived from the prostate. L-fimbrin occurs at higher levels in prostate cancer tissue as compared with normal prostate tissue. Immunohistochemical staining has suggested that the increase of fimbrin occurs predominantly in the glandular epithelial cells of the carcinoma, whereas in normal prostate tissue, it is found mainly in the...

The Autoimmune Response In Lung Cancer Is Similar To That In The Systemic Autoimmune Diseases

A parallel can be drawn between the systemic autoimmune diseases and cancer in relation to the antinuclear antibodies observed in both conditions. In both, cellular proteins become antigenic targets of a humoral response. By far the most common autoantibodies Table 1. Predicting ability of antinuclear antibodies. (The ability of antinuclear antibodies to predict lung cancer cell type, diagnosis, or progression-free survival were analyzed by cross-validated CART) Lung cancer diagnosis nm60, ami 15, nm200, hm55, lgl60, ag75, smlOO, agl80, found in the systemic autoimmune diseases are those directed against nuclear antigens 8, 23-26, 56 . Attempts to show nuclear reactivity in patients with cancer using characterized antigens known to be involved in the immune response in the systemic autoimmune diseases have been unrewarding 14, 57 . The failure of cancer sera to recognize those antigens may merely reflect the presence of different specificities related to the cancer itself. A...

Having a family history of breast cancer

It was apparent that a number of those I met had undertaken a good deal of investigative work to explore in more detail the history of cancer in their family. Deborah talked about how after her mother's two sisters had developed breast cancer they had then uncovered what she termed an 'extensive' family history. We've done a bit more chipping away to see whether there has been more breast cancer back in other generations. We'd never looked into it until after her sisters Deborah's mother had breast cancer and then we were like hang on a minute oh yes auntie so and so died of cancer. to possible cases of cancer that might have been hidden, unbeknown to her and others in the family. However, for most it was not just the fact that significant aspects of family history had been recently discovered or that there could potentially be hidden cases of cancer that they did not know about it was more that the family history they were aware of pointed to an undeniable danger. This was...

Epigenetic Therapy Of Cancer

Apart from gene silencing, other effects of DNA methylation include spontaneous deamination, enhanced DNA binding of carcinogens and increased UV absorption by DNA, all of which increase the rate of mutations, DNA adduct formation and subsequent gene inactivation DNA methylation is one such epigenetic phenomenon, which is abnormal in tumor cells (Szyf, 2003 Lund and van Lohuizen, 2004). Methylation of CpG islands, a feature of cancer cells, occurs rarely in normal tissue. Hence, methylation provides a tumor specific therapeutic target. De novo methylation as well as maintenance of methylation is carried out by DNMTs. There are 5 known human DNMTs - DNMT1, DNMT2, DNMT3a, DNMT3b and DNMT3L. Apart from DNMT2 and DNMT3L, which lack the amino terminal regulatory domain and the catalytic domain respectively (Goll and Bestor, 2005), the remaining DNMTs all have enzymatic function. Inactivation of DNMTs is the most effective means of inhibiting DNA methylation and restoring normal patterns of...

Aging and Carcinogenesis

The increased incidence of cancer with age may be explained by the three, non-mutually exclusive mechanisms (1) 1. Duration of carcinogenesis As carcinogenesis is lengthy and may extend over decades, it is reasonable to expect that cancer becomes more common with aging. 2. Increased susceptibility of aging tissues to environmental carcinogens due to the similarity of molecular changes of aging and carcinogenesis. 3. Changes in bodily environment that may favor the growth of cancer, including immune senescence and proliferative senescence of fibroblasts. Tumor growth may be altered by two nonmutually exclusive mechanisms. Thinking of cancer as a tree, the growth of the tree may be influenced by the nature of the seed, or the tumor cell, and of the soil, or the tumor host. In rodents, the influence of the tumor host has been clearly established when the same tumor load of B16 melanoma and LLC was injected in older and younger animals, the younger animals died earlier and with increased...

Aging and Cancer Control

Any decision related to cancer prevention and treatment in older individuals is predicated upon the following questions. 1. Is the patient going to die of cancer or with cancer 2. Is the cancer going to affect the patient's welfare during the patient's lifetime TABLE 1 Human Cancers Whose Clinical Behavior May Change with Age Breast cancer Celomic cancer of the ovary cancer of the lung Increased prevalence of well differentiated, hormone-receptor rich cancers Soil More common cancer in ex-smokers

Translational Research And Cancer Management In The Older Person

Translational research has improved enormously the management of cancer in older individuals already, as shown in the following examples 1. Development of antidotes to the toxicity of cytotoxic chemotherapy. Filgrastim and pegfilgrastim have reduced by more than 50 the incidence of neutropenic infections in older individuals receiving cytotoxic chemotherapy and have allowed a large portion of these patients to receive treatment at full doses (22). At the same time, erythropoietic growth factors have contributed to the preservation of quality of life and functional independence of older cancer patients (22). In addition to these noticeable achievements, translational research promises to benefit the management of cancer of older individuals in several areas, shown in Table 3. The importance of some of these areas, such as the recognition of early markers of carcinogenesis, development of targeted chemoprevention, and new forms of cancer treatment, is self-evident and does not need...

The Function Evolutionarily Conserved Selective Value Of Replicative Senescence An Anticancer Mechanism

Because TERT appears to be re-expressed in the majority of human cancers 13, it is been hypothesized that the process by which TERT is repressed in most somatic cells is an anti-cancer mechanism. The best evidence that TERT repression is indeed an anti-cancer mechanism in human cells comes from data showing that the well-known oncoproteins Ras and SV40 T antigen cannot transform a normal human cell into a tumor cell unless they are also expressed together with TERT84. Presumably, the reason that TERT can co-operate with other oncogenes is that, during the process by which a normal cell and its descendants become fully malignant tumor cells, many cell divisions must take place and telomeres would become critically short, unless the cell activates telomerase or other mechanisms to prevent telomere shortening. Thus the combination of initially short telomeres, suppression of TERT expression, and a checkpoint that triggers replicative senescence in response to short telomeres, together...

HPV 1618 vaccine could prevent 70 of cervical cancers

Munoz N, Bosch FX, de Saniose S et al. International Agency for Research on Cancer Multlcenter Cervical Study Group. N Engl J Med2003 348 518-27. Fig. 1 HPV types in cervical cancer It is now widely accepted that high-risk HPV infections are a necessary, but not sufficient, cause of virtually all cases of cervical cancer worldwide (Fig. 2) and are a likely cause of a substantial proportion of other anogenital neoplasms and oral squamous cell carcinomas. An estimated 85 of anal cancers 50 of the cancers of the vulva, vagina, and penis 20 of oropharyngeal cancers and 10 of laryngeal and esophageal cancers are attributable to HPV (CDC 2004).

Influence of Changes in Bodily Environment on Carcinogenesis

The evidence is accumulating that age is a chronic and progressive inflammation, and the levels of some inflammatory markers, including IL-6, D-dimer, and C-reactive proteins, correlate with life expectancy, risk of disability, sarcopenia, and risk of common geriatric syndromes (10,14,28). The basic question of aging biology is whether chronic inflammation is just a marker of aging or instead is responsible for the manifestations of aging. In other words, is it possible that reversal of chronic inflammation may delay the manifestations of aging, including carcinogenesis From the cancer standpoint, is it important to ask whether 1. chronic inflammation causes epigenetic changes characteristic both of aging and carcinogenesis Other environmental changes that may favor carcinogenesis include immune and proliferative senescence. This area is poorly known and extremely important for understanding the prognosis of cancer in older individuals. It is not impossible that these effects may also...

Hepatocyte Growth Factor And Met In Tumour Invasionmetastasis From Mechanisms To Cancer Prevention

Abstract Hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a ligand for c-met proto-oncogene product of receptor tyrosine kinase, exhibits powerful motogenic and angiogenic activities. The utilization of the HGF-Met system in cancer cells confers invasive and metastatic potentials. HGF potently enhances dissociation of cells, cell-matrix interaction, extracellular matrix breakdown, invasion, and angiogenesis, all critical events in the metastatic cascade. Tumour-stromal interaction mediated by HGF, aberrant expression of Met, autocrine or mutational activation of Met are tightly associated with carcinogenesis and malignant progression in a wide variety of tumours. Notably, NK4, the four kringle-antagonist for HGF-Met signaling inhibited tumour invasion and metastasis. The possibility has arisen that an HGF-antagonist can serve as a new therapeutic strategy for treatment of cancer patients. In normal tissues, HGF supports dynamic tissue remodeling for regeneration and the clinical application of HGF for...

Role Of Various Factors In The Development Of Cancers

Most cancer types vary in incidence and mortality among different populations in different parts of the world. When populations move from one country to another, the rates for many cancers tend toward that of the local population rather than that of their country of origin. A classic example is the incidence rates among Japanese individuals living in Osaka, Japan, in contrast to those who have moved to Hawaii (Fig. 3-9).49 Within a generation, the incidence for prostate, colon, and breast cancer begin to approach those of the United States population, whereas the incidence of stomach cancer, more prevalent in Japan, decreases. Another interesting point from the data in Figure 3-9 is that from 1970-71 to 1988-92, some of the ''more Western cancers'' became more prevalent in Japan, presumably because of a more Westernized diet and lifestyle. Some specific causes of cancer are known, the most prominent of which is cigarette smoking (Table 3-5). However, the causes for the large

Anticancer drugs The Holy Grail of the pharmaceutical industry

The 100+ known varieties of cancer share a common characteristic the uncontrolled growth of cells that take on abnormal shapes and cease their normal functions. The most effective anti-cancer drugs work either by selectively poisoning cancer cells or by preventing them from reproducing. Some of the most promising progress in recent years has been based on research into the defence mechanisms of marine animals and plants, especially those from southern oceans. Many parts of the ocean floor are populated by organisms that look vulnerable because they move slowly or not at all, and have no protective shells or any apparent ability to resist a predator. What they often do have, however, are toxins so potent and complex that there's no need for any other defence. Eleutherobin, a chemical derived from a soft coral originally collected off the northwest coast ofAustralia, works by preventing cancerous cells from reproducing, and could be more effective than taxol (a derivative of the bark of...

Can Replicative Senescence Act To Promote Cancer

If cells that reach the Ml telomere length truly senesce in vivo, and then undergo the same kinds of changes in gene expression as they do in culture, this process could certainly have adverse effects on tissue function. In this regard one can pose a series of related questions (i) Do cells undergo telomere shortening to the extent of reaching the Ml telomere length (ii) If so, is the consequence of this the same as it is in culture, i.e. the generation of senescent cells, or do they suffer some other fate (e.g. crisis) (iii) If they become senescent, do such cells accumulate in tissues, or are they eliminated by some part of either the acquired or innate immune system (iv) If they do accumulate in tissues, do they exert a pro-carcinogenic effect because they secrete proteases and cytokines The most significant evidence for the occurrence of senescent cells in aging tissues is the occurrence of cells that stain for senescence-associated (3-galactosidase (SA-fS-gal) in tissues as a...

Hgf In Cancer Invasion And Metastasis

While HGF exhibits multiple biological activities for remodeling and maintenance of tissues, HGF greatly affects behaviors of a wide variety of cancer cells. Biological activities of HGF on various types of cancer cells are summarized in Table 1. Consistent with Met receptor expression in normal epithelial cells, HGF targets many types of carcinoma cells (tumour originating from epithelial cells), whereas aberrant expression of the Met receptor has been noted in tumours originating from mesenchymal cells and hematopoetic cells. HGF is involved in malignant behavior of these tumour cells and exhibits distinct biological activities on cancer cells, depending on the cell type. It is noteworthy that HGF has bi-directional effects on proliferation of cancer cells. Consistently, tumor cytotoxic factor, originally identified as fibroblast-derived cytotoxic growth inhibitor for some types of cancer cells, was shown to be identical to HGF (16). Particularly, HGF inhibits proliferation of about...

The Influence Of Advanced Age On Cancer Occurrence And Growth

Recently there has been an increased awareness of the overlapping biologic pathways operant in the processes of aging and carcinogenesis. Coincidently, there has been increased interest in both basic and clinical research pertaining to cancer and aging. There remain many unanswered questions about cancer management in geriatric patients, in part, due to the lack of understanding of the influence of age on tumor biology. This review will attempt to establish a framework around themes in aging biology that are relevant to the development and progression of cancer.

Monitoring Of Cancer Patients

As yet, only a few studies (Table 1) focused on the fate of p53AAb in the follow-up of tumor patients. In 1994, Angelopoulou et al. 60 monitored five patients with ovarian cancer and one with breast cancer and showed that temporal changes of p53AAb correlated with disease progression or regression. The authors concluded that this immunization represents a continous process driven by the tumor and is not a temporally isolated event. In a later report on another breast cancer patient, reappearance of p53AAb was observed two years after initial therapy which predated the clinical diagnosis of a relapse by three months (Lu-bin et al. as cited in 88 ). With 17 initially seropositive head and neck cancer patients, 5 8 recurrences were accompanied by an increase in p53AAb levels 89 levels of the three others remained unchanged as in six of nine patients without a relapse. The remaining three patients showed an increase in p53AAb without indications of a recurrence (32 months into follow-up)....

Colorectal and Other Digestive Tract Cancers

Several randomized trials have shown no reduction in colorectal cancer risk with -carotene supplementation (8,10). However, two trials indicated that among regular alcohol users b-carotene supplementation decreases colon cancer risk (12,13). The carotenoid supplementation in alcohol users may be more effective because their serum b-carotene levels appear to be lower than in nonusers (14,15). In another study (16), b-carotene was not effective in preventing colorectal adenoma (a precursor of invasive carcinoma). High lycopene intake was associated with lower risk for gastric cancer (17). In an integrated series of studies in Italy (18), tomato consumption showed a consistent inverse relation with a risk of digestive tract neoplasms. However, these findings were not confirmed by other studies (19,20).

Industrial Chemicals and Occupational Cancers

The chemicals and industrial processes that have a known or suspected etiologic role in the development of cancer are listed in Table 3-6. As noted above, about 2 -5 of all cancer deaths are attributed to occupational hazards. Of those agents listed as carcinogenic for humans, a number were identified because of their close association between an abnormal clustering of certain cancers and exposure to an industrial chemical or process. For example, epidemiologic studies of workers occupationally exposed to industrial levels of 4-aminobiphenyl have a higher incidence of bladder cancer.80 Occupational exposure to asbestos fibers results in a higher incidence of lung cancer, mesotheliomas, gastrointestinal tract cancers, and laryngeal cancers.81 As mentioned earlier, cigarette smoking and occupational exposure to asbestos act synergistically to increase the incidence of lung cancer. Several epidemiologic studies have shown increased frequency of leukemia in workers exposed to...

Clinical Indications of Hyaluronan in Cancer

Extensive studies have examined HA levels in clinical tumours and in body fluids such as serum from cancer patients. A summary of the clinical tumours assessed for HA levels is shown in Table 1 with representative references. The number of these types of studies has increased steadily as methods have developed and become available to investigate HA in tumours and in their surrounding stroma. Evaluation of HA has employed techniques such as HPLC (17) or electrophoresis and enzyme digestion (15) to assess the HA content of tumours, as well as direct tumour staining for HA. Using a biotinylated affinity probe specific for HA, Anttila et al. (20) characterised HA staining in 309 epithelial ovarian tumours and 45 matched metastatic tumours. The high stromal staining seen in 98 carcinomas was significantly correlated with poor differentiation, serous histological type, advanced stage and large primary residual tumour. The 5 yr follow-up of the disease showed that overall survival and...

Prognostic Value Of Circulating Tumor Cells In Metastatic Breast Cancer

Only three studies have correlated the presence of immunopurified CTCs with clinical outcome. The first by Gaforio et al. (30) evaluated a heterogeneous population of patients spanning the clinical contexts of neoadjuvant therapy, adjuvant therapy, and metastatic disease. Utilizing Kaplan-Meier analysis for progressionfree survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS), they found that patients with elevated CTCs prior to therapy had worse PFS (P 0.058) and OS (P 0.003). However, they did not stratify for disease stage, and at the time of publication neither of the medians for PFS or OS had been reached, making interpretation of the data difficult. The second study by Bauernhofer et al. (27) evaluated CTCs in 32 patients with metastatic breast cancer. They found that patients with detectable CTCs had a significantly shorter median OS of four months, compared with 13 months for patients without CTCs (P < 0.001). These authors did not specify the timing of the blood draws, and they did not...

Carcinogenesis and invasionmetastasis via activation of Met receptor

Establish the autocrine loop of the HGF-Met receptor Expression of HGF in Metpositive (but HGF-negative) epithelial cells, or expression of Met receptor in HGF-positive (but Met-negative) mesenchymal cells. When the HGF gene was stably expressed in a murine hepatic epithelial cell line, the cells showed a scattered phenotype, were capable of growing in soft agar and were tumourigenic in nude mice (152). Similarly, transfection of HGF in non-parenchymal liver epithelial cells resulted in establishment of the HGF-Met autocrine loop, and importantly, these cells exhibited invasive behavior and metastasized to the lung in nude mice (153). On the other hand, stable expression of the Met receptor gene in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts conferred tumourigenic and invasive characteristics in nude mice (154-156). Similarly, expression of the Met receptor gene in mouse 127 cells and human leiomyosarcoma cells resulted in establishment of the HGF-Met autocrine loop and concomitant progression from...

Effects Of Carotenoids On Cancer In Animal Experimental Models

One of the problems confronting investigators studying the effect of carotenoids in animal models is that rat and mouse, the species most widely utilized for cancer research, poorly absorb dietary carotenoids. In addition, to achieve a clear anticancer effect in short-term experiments, high carotenoid tissue levels are necessary thus, the animals are fed diets containing large amounts of carotenoids. Therefore, the extrapolation of results to the situation in humans may be even more difficult than anticipated (49). Despite these shortcomings, rodents have been extensively used to evaluate the role of dietary carotenoids in the development of cancer (50-54). Many of these studies have indicated that the formation and growth of various types of tumors are reduced by treatment with different carotenoids. Lycopene effectively inhibits the growth of glioma cells transplanted in rats (55), development of spontaneous mammary tumors in SHN virgin mice (50,56), and induction of rat mammary...

Aberrant expression of Met receptor in cancers

At least two distinct mechanisms by which the Met receptor is over-expressed in cancers could be considerable, i.e., transcriptional activation or amplification of the c-met gene. In case of colorectal cancers, over-expression of the Met receptor was related to transcriptional activation in 90 of the primary tumours, whereas 8 among 9 cases of metastases of colorectal cancers accompanied amplification of c-met gene (189). Amplification of the c-met gene may possibly occur more frequently in late stage metastatic tumours than in primary tumours, presumably due to chromosomal instability in advanced cancers. Table 3, Expression of Met receptor in cancers_ Colorectal cancer over-expressed higher in metastatic tumours 188, 189 Gastric cancer over-expressed and related to the increase in 62, 192 disease state over expressed and higher in diffuse and high grade invasive cancers

Hyaluronan Mediated Signalling Mechanisms in Cancer

Increasingly a number of guanine exchange factors (GEFs) have been identified (97) as downstream components of HA-mediated signalling. Evidence of Rac-1 signalling upon binding of HA with CD44 and its effect on tumour cell activation have been described above. Additionally Tiam 1, which is another GEF, was reported to interact with CD44v3 and to up-regulate Rac-1 signalling and cytoskeletal-mediated metastatic breast cancer progression (98). In a continued search for other CD44 isoform-linked GEFs, which correlated with tumour metastasis, Vav2 was identified (99). This group carefully dissected the interaction of CD44v3 and Vav2 and proposed that CD44v3-Vav2 interacts with Grb2-p185HER2 to form a signalling complex that had a pivotal role in promoting cross-talk between RAC1 and Ras signalling pathways, ultimately causing the migration and growth of ovarian cancer. different functions, including malignant transformation (e.g., CD44v) in different cancers by interactions with specific...

Chemotherapy Regimens and Cancer Care

VADEMECUM Chemotherapy Regimens and Cancer Care LANDES BIOSCIENCE Georgetown, Texas U.S.A. Chemotherapy regimens and cancer care Alan D. Langerak, Luke P. Dreisbach. 1. Antineoplastic agents--Handbooks, manuals, etc. 2. Cancer--Chemo therapy--Handbooks, manuals, etc. I. Dreisbach, Luke P. II. Title. III. Series.

Cancer Around The World

Cancer has become one of the most devastating diseases worldwide. Every year, 10 million people are diagnosed with cancer, and of these, 6 million will die of this disease. Virtually every family, in every country of the world, has at least one member afflicted with this disease. The disease burden is immense, not only for the victims and their families, but for the medical establishments that struggle to meet the demand for care and treatment. In 1948 the United Nations established the World Health Organization (WHO) to help people around the world attain the highest level of health. As part of the fight against cancer, WHO has collected data on the worldwide incidence of cancer to give governing bodies an estimate of the magnitude of the problem. This information has provided crucial insights into the causes of cancer and possibilities for treatment and prevention.