Lightness Similarity

Evidence from my own laboratory relevant to theoretical accounts of the development of object perception has focused on when and how humans become capable of grouping parts of a stimulus together to form a coherent whole. A study by Quinn, Burke, and Rush (1993) hints at answers to both questions. The stimuli are shown in the left half of Figure 5.1. As reported by Wertheimer (1923/1958), adult participants group together the elements of such stimuli on the basis of lightness similarity and represent the top pattern shown in Panel (a) as a set of columns, and the bottom pattern depicted in Panel (b) as a set of rows. Quinn et al. reasoned that if young infants, 3 months of age, organize the patterns shown in Panels (a) and (b) of Figure 5.1 into columns and rows based on lightness similarity, then they should respond differentially to the vertical- and horizontal-grating test stimuli shown in the right half of the figure. On the assumption that there is no spontaneous preference between the vertical and horizontal stripes, infants familiarized with columns should generalize to verticals and prefer horizontals, whereas infants familiarized with rows should generalize to horizontals and prefer verticals. This is precisely the result that was obtained—a finding indicating that young infants were able to use lightness similarity to represent the row- and column-like organization of the individual light and dark squares.

One could take issue with the grouping via lightness similarity interpretation proposed by Quinn et al. (1993) by claiming that the apparent perceptual grouping is actually a by-product of immature

a

a

Joy Of Modern Parenting Collection

Joy Of Modern Parenting Collection

This is a collection of parenting guides. Within this collection you will find the following titles: Issues, rule and discipline, self esteem and tips plus more.

Get My Free Ebook


Post a comment