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Reproduced with permission from Chromatography of Environmental Hazards. Copyright 1973, Elsevier Science.

Reproduced with permission from Chromatography of Environmental Hazards. Copyright 1973, Elsevier Science.

used with an 8 ft X 0.25- m diameter stainless steel tube fitted with 12.4 g of Linds 5 A molecular sieve. The carrier gas was hydrogen at a flow rate of 40 ml/min, column temperature 30°C, and the thermal conductivity detector current 250 mA. The ammonia decomposition vessel was made of quartz tube and had a capacity of 25 ml.

Smith and Clark94 compared the sensitivities of a number of gases using katharometer detection, and demonstrated the rather poor sensitivity of ammonia for this type of detector. Sensitivity of some gases using katharometer detection has been listed in Table 9.2.

Liquid anhydrous ammonia is used extensively as a coolant in heat exchange systems because of its chemical stability, low corrosiveness, and high latent heat of vaporization. However, anhydrous ammonia is readily contaminated during handling and storage. The gas chromatographic analysis of trace contaminants (O2, N2, CO, CH4, C02, and water) in liquid ammonia was described by Mindrup and Taylor.95 An F&M Model 5750 equipped with a Carle Microcavity Thermistor detector was used with dual columns for analysis. Table 9.3 lists the experimental parameters for both columns, which were conditioned for a minimum of 12 h at a temperature of 180°C and a

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