Coping with Countertransference

Countertransference is defined as therapist emotional and behavioral reactions to clients. As an example, imagine an interviewer who lost his mother to cancer when he was a child. His father's grief was very severe. As a consequence, little emotional support was available when the interviewer was a child. The situation eventually improved, his father recovered, and the interviewer's conscious memory consists of a general sense that losing his mother was very difficult. Now, years later, he's a...

Current Situation and Functioning

This section of the intake report focuses on three main topics (a) usual daily activities, (b) client self-perception of personal strengths, and (c) apparent ability to adequately perform usual age-appropriate activities of daily living. Depending on your setting and preference, it is also possible to expand on this section by including a description of the client's psychological functioning, cognitive functioning, emotional functioning, or personality functioning. This provides the interviewer...

Attitude toward Examiner Interviewer

Parents, teachers, and mental health professionals often overuse the word attitude. When someone claims a student or client has an attitude problem or a bad attitude, it can be difficult to determine precisely what is being communicated. In the mental health field, attitude toward the interviewer refers to how clients behave in relation to the interviewer that is, attitude is defined as behavior that occurs in an interpersonal context. Observation of concrete physical characteristics and...

Identifying Evaluating and Exploring Client Problems and Goals

Your first, and perhaps primary, objective is to find out about your client's distress. As an interviewer, your exploration of a client's chief complaint begins with your opening statement (e.g., What brings you here or How can I be of help see Chapter 6). After the opening statement, at least 5 to 15 minutes should be spent tracking the client and trying to understand exactly why he or she has come to see you (Shea, 1998). In some cases, clients clearly identify their reasons for seeking...