TABLE 1610 Types of Facial Paralysis

Facial weakness or paralysis may result either (1) from a peripheral lesion of CN palsy, is compared with a central lesion, exemplified by a left hemispheric cere-

VII, the facial nerve, anywhere from its origin in the pons to its periphery in the brovascular accident. Note their different effects on the upper part of the face, by face, or (2) from a central lesion involving the upper motor neurons between the which they can be distinguished. cortex and the pons. A peripheral lesion of CN VII, exemplified here by a Bell's

CN VII—Peripheral Lesion

Peripheral nerve damage to CN VII paralyzes the entire right side of the face, including the forehead.

CN VII peripheral lesion

CN VII peripheral lesion

Motor cortex

Synapses in the pons

Facial nerve

Motor cortex

Closing Eyes

Synapses in the pons

Facial nerve

Eye does not close; eyeball rolls up

Flat nasolabial fold

Closing Eyes

Eye does not close; eyeball rolls up

Raising Eyebrows

Forehead not wrinkled; eyebrow not raised

Raising Eyebrows

Paralysis of lower face

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