Data from the United Kingdom

Incidence data for people aged 15-24 years in England (United Kingdom) have been published recently in more detail [7]. The results are shown in Table 10.2.

Figure 10.1

Incidence of central nervous system (CNS) tumors in American children, adolescents, and young adults by tumor type according to age at diagnosis. Data from the United States SEER Program [1]

Figure 10.2

Ranked incidence by histological subtype in patients diagnosed with a brain tumor between 15 and 19 years of age, inclusive. Data from the Central Brain Tumor Registry of the United States (CBTRUS), 2004-2005 [6]. AYA adolescents/young adults, Astro 1 grade I astrocytoma, Astro2 grade II astrocytoma, Astro 3 grade III astrocytoma, Astro 4 grade IV astrocytoma, PNET primitive neuroectodermal tumor, GCTgerm-cell tumor, Malig malignant, Oligo oligodendroglioma, Anapl anaplastic, NOS not otherwise specified

Table 10.2 Incidence per 100,000 of malignant central nervous system (CNS) tumors at age 15-24 years in England, 1979-1997 [7]. PNET Primitive neuroectodermal tumor

15-19 years

20-24 years

Astrocytoma

0.83

0.86

Low grade

0.18

0.10

High grade

0.12

0.14

Unspecified

0.53

0.61

Other glioma

0.29

0.44

Ependymoma

0.10

0.12

PNET

0.15

0.15

Germ cell

0.08

0.05

Other specified

0.04

0.04

Unspecified

0.16

0.16

Total

1.64

1.82

Total incidence was somewhat lower than in the SEER data, but the relative frequencies of the histological subtypes were similar. Among astrocytomas of specified grade, low-grade tumors accounted for a higher proportion at age 15-19 years, whereas high-grade tumors were more frequent at age 20-24 years. In both age groups, more than 60% of astrocytomas were of unspecified subtype. Variations in incidence of specific histological types in other regions of the world are generally poorly documented.

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